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Roughing It

Mark Twain

Book Overview: 

Roughing It is semi-autobiographical travel literature written by American humorist Mark Twain. It was authored as a sequel to his first book Innocents Abroad. This book tells of Twain’s adventures prior to his pleasure cruise related in Innocents Abroad.

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Book Excerpt: 
. . .It is chloroform in print. If Joseph Smith composed this book, the act was a miracle—keeping awake while he did it was, at any rate. If he, according to tradition, merely translated it from certain ancient and mysteriously-engraved plates of copper, which he declares he found under a stone, in an out-of-the-way locality, the work of translating was equally a miracle, for the same reason.

The book seems to be merely a prosy detail of imaginary history, with the Old Testament for a model; followed by a tedious plagiarism of the New Testament. The author labored to give his words and phrases the quaint, old-fashioned sound and structure of our King James's translation of the Scriptures; and the result is a mongrel—half modern glibness, and half ancient simplicity and gravity. The latter is awkward and constrained; the former natural, but grotesque by the contrast. Whenever he found his speech growing too modern—which was about every sentence or t. . . Read More