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60-Second Science

Scientific American


Podcast Overview

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast

Podcast Episodes

Old Records Help Resurrect Historic Quake

Century-old records found in Puerto Rico helped reconstruct the damage caused there by a magnitude 7.3 earthquake—and could help disaster experts plan for the next big one. Julia Rosen reports. 

This Cell Phone Needs No Battery

An experimental cell phone works by absorbing and reflecting radio waves—meaning it's incredibly energy efficient and needs no battery. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Bacteria Might Share the Blame for Eczema

In patients with severe eczema, Staphylococcus aureus strains dominated the skin microbe population—suggesting that certain types of bacteria could worsen eczema flares. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

Franklin's Lightning Rod Served Political Ends

Whether lightning rods should have rounded or pointy ends became a point of contention between rebellious Americans and King George III.  

Heat Will Hit America's Poorest Worst

Economists calculate that each degree Celsius of warming will dock the U.S. economy by 1.2 percent--and increase the divide between rich and poor. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

Rainbow Photons Pack More Computing Power

Quantum bits, aka qubits, can simultaneously encode 0 and 1. But multicolored photons could enable even more states to exist at the same time, ramping up computing power. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Moths Inspire Better Smartphone Screens

Researchers designed an antireflective coating for smartphone screens, with inspiration from the bumpy eyes of moths. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Better Memory Begets Boredom

The better study participants scored in the memory test, the faster they got bored. Karen Hopkin reports.

DNA Points to Multiple Migrations into the Americas

DNA analysis of skeletons found in the Pacific Northwest backs up traditional oral histories, and suggests there could have been more than one colonization of the Americas. Emily Schwing reports.

Keep Rolling Luggage Upright with Physics

A team of physicists has revealed why rolling suitcases start rocking from wheel to wheel—and how to avoid that frustrating phenomenon. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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