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Lesser Hippias

Plato

Book Overview: 

This work may not be by Plato, or his entirely, but Jowett has offered his sublime translation, and seems to lean towards including it in the canon. Socrates tempted by irony to deflate the pretentious know-it-all Hippias, an arrogant polymath, appears to follow humor more than honor in this short dialogue.

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Book Excerpt: 
. . .Athenians among the Athenians,' falsifying persons and dates, and casting a veil over the gloomier events of Athenian history. It exhibits an acquaintance with the funeral oration of Thucydides, and was, perhaps, intended to rival that great work. If genuine, the proper place of the Menexenus would be at the end of the Phaedrus. The satirical opening and the concluding words bear a great resemblance to the earlier dialogues; the oration itself is professedly a mimetic work, like the speeches in the Phaedrus, and cannot therefore be tested by a comparison of the other writings of Plato. The funeral oration of Pericles is expressly mentioned in the Phaedrus, and this may have suggested the subject, in the same manner that the Cleitophon appears to be suggested by the slight mention of Cleitophon and his attachment to Thrasymachus in the Republic; and the Theages by the mention of Theages in the Apology and Republic; or as the Second Alcibiades seems to be founded upon the t. . . Read More

Community Reviews

Plato's work Parmenides has been rated by some as a spoof, a less-than-serious work, a work filled with contradictions and errors. This it may well be, but it is also a fascinating account, an experiment in the art of the philosopher and discussion to prove a point.

In essence it attempts to prove th

This volume of Plato's works served as a source for reading and discussion in classes on both the Cratylus and the Parmenides of Plato in the Basic Program of Liberal Education of The University of Chicago.
The formal topic of the Cratylus is ‘correctness of names’, a hot topic in the late fifth cent

Every 1L law school class. Ever.

I purchased this Loeb volume for Reginald Allen's course on the Parmenides because it provided both a version of the Greek text and an additional translation.

I feel a bit disingenuous labeling this as "read" -- I really only read Hippias Major (on the beautiful) since it relates to my dissertation topic. I wasn't really interested in the other dialogues (sorry), but it is impossible to find H.Maj. printed all by its lonesome. Apart from that little hiccu

Craylus is not worth reading if you don't understand ancient Greek.
Parmenides was a burden to read. The Greater and Lesser Hippias were o.k. but probably not authentic work of Plato.

Read Hippias Minor. I like the question of the dialogue a lot, but the execution is poor. I'm thinking Plato didn't write this one.

The Parmenides: "Anything which is sensible and changeable cannot be known." Hahaha.