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The Economist Radio (All audio)

The Economist


Podcast Overview

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Podcast Episodes

The week ahead: Junior move

US editor John Prideaux parses the latest scandal to hit the American president. Did Donald junior break any laws by meeting a Russian lawyer during the presidential campaign? Also, many African leaders see Paul Kagame's Rwanda as a model to emulate. They are wrong. And finally, why belief in sorcery has grave consequences in Papua New Guinea. 

The Economist asks special: The World If…

In this episode, hosted by Daniel Franklin, we look at The Economist's annual assortment of scenarios taken to their logical extremes. We discuss the Macron miracle, a world where blockchains rule and the conundrum of controlling the weather.

Babbage: The power of young blood

Scientists are investigating the apparent benefits of infusing young blood into the body of an older animal. Author and academic Tim Wu explains why our attention is such a vital commodity. And virtual reality is breathing new life into old rollercoasters

Money talks: A stormy time for America’s GDP

A new report has established a link between America’s annual GDP and climate change. But can weather shifts really affect an entire country’s economy? Also, why China is likely to lead in artificial intelligence. And the Big Mac index and its purchasing-power parity. Hosted by Philip Coggan.

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the July 10th 2017 edition

This week: Ethiopia’s cunning pirates, how to use Twitter to study dialects and Colombia’s colourful future in ecotourism

The week ahead: Ballistic ambitions

Defence editor Matthew Symonds tells us why there is very little the world can do to stop North Korea from developing nuclear missiles. Also, why Britain's "Corbynistas" are actually middle class. And Islamic State retreats from Mosul, leaving behind a city in ruins. Helen Joyce hosts.

The Economist asks: Is big data fundamentally racist?

Algorithms are increasingly being used to make sense of the world. But does big data implicitly discriminate against people based on income, race or class? We ask Cathy O’Neil, a data scientist and author of Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy

Babbage: Fluid intelligence

Zapping the brain with a weak electric current enhances its visual cortex. Is this a way to help squeeze more value out of our grey matter? Also, how a new miniature phone camera is making us rethink every aspect of photography. And why whales have become so good at filtering food. Hal Hodson hosts.

Money talks: Vorsprung durch Angst

Germany is admired for a stable economy and holding on to blue-collar jobs but derided for its persistent trade surpluses. Our economics editor John O’Sullivan examines what Chancellor Merkel’s government might do next. Also, how “total immersion” could drive the masses to virtual reality. And why banks are de-risking to avoid penalties. Hosted by Simon Long.

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the July 1st 2017 edition

This week: The chocolate curtain dividing Europe, frozen treats behind battle lines and how science got women wrong

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