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The Wreck of the Titan

Morgan Robertson

Book Overview: 

This novel was published a full 14 years before the sinking of the Titanic, but listeners may be surprised at how many parallels this fictional tale has with subsequent true events.

The Titan is the largest and most technologically advanced steamship of her time. She is considered unsinkable. Her full speed crossings of the Northern Lane Route carry her rich passengers in the highest standards of luxury and comfort. The less well-off travel in rougher quarters but still benefit from the speed of travel. These crossings, however, are fraught with navigational hazards, the greatest of which is ice.

Unlike the ship, one member of her crew is not of the highest standard. At least, not anymore. John Rowland is a broken man who drinks to forget his past. However, when the Titan crashes into an iceberg during her attempt to break a speed record, he is forced to confront his past. Can he overcome his enemies and escape as the ship begins to sink? And can he make his way back to civilization and find self-respect once more? Adventure and soul-searching await Rowland, with a surprise ending.

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Book Excerpt: 
. . .Who says so—how do you know it?" blustered the captain. "You have only that bulletin statement of the man Rowland—an irresponsible drunkard."

"The man was lifted aboard drunk at New York," broke in the first officer, "and remained in a condition of delirium tremens up to the shipwreck. We did not meet the Royal Age and are in no way responsible for her loss."

"Yes," added Captain Bryce, "and a man in that condition is liable to see anything. We listened to his ravings on the night of the wreck. He was on lookout—on the bridge. Mr. Austen, the boats'n, and myself were close to him."

Before Mr. Meyer's oily smile had indicated to the flustered captain that he had said too much, the door opened and admitted Rowland, pale, and weak, with empty left sleeve, leaning on the arm of a bronze-bearded and manly-looking giant who carried little Myra on the other shoulder, and who said, in the breezy tone of the quarter-deck:

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Community Reviews

I have heard of this book for many years, since my oldest daughter became interested in the Titanic as a child. It was written in 1898, but only recently published in 1997 for the general public. It is an eerily similar story to the story of the Titanic, many say prophetic. That said, I was a lit...more

In this review I will discuss two things: 1) The story of the Titan as it relates to the wreck of the Titanic and 2) This 1994 reprint, and the author's actual writing skill, on their own merits.

1) Yes, this book was added to my "Titanic" bookshelf collection because of the similarities between t...more

Having been interested in the Titanic for as long as I can remember I had often heard of this story and the uncanny similarities between the Titan and the Titanic. It was only recently that I actually got hold of this book and read it though.

And let me say that I think it's almost a shame that th...more

It's the story of the grandest ocean liner to sail the Atlantic. She sails fast through the cold water on her maiden voyage. On a clear night, she ends up hitting an iceberg and sinking. Only a few people make it to the lifeboats and there is a great loss of life.

Sound familiar? The story was pu...more

I was expecting the sinking of the ship to take place near the end of the story, but it happens before the 50% mark and was quite anticlimactic. What follows is a melodramatic mess, in which the main character escapes the sinking by climbing onto an iceberg, fights a polar bear with only a small...more

I am shocked at how similar this 1898 novella is to the sinking of the Titanic! Either the author inherited Jules Verne's crystal ball or this is the biggest coincidence ever. I'll have to do a bit of research on what proof there is for the publication date being fourteen years prior to the Titan...more

This is a work of fiction. I say that because it has an eerie similarity to the story of the sinking of the Titanic in 1912. But this story was written in 1898, 14 years before the real disaster. Similarities like the name, Titan. 3,000 people on board, not enough lifeboats, traveling to fast for...more

For years I have heard about this book. Many say this fictional tale about the sinking of a great ship, the Titan, mirrors the wreck of the Titanic in 1912. This fact is astounding because the book was written in 1898, 14 years before the Titanic sank after striking an iceberg. Robertson said the...more

Did Morgan Robertson really predict the future or were there just a number of strange coincidences in his novella? The story of The Wreck of the Titan (or Futility as was its 1898 title) is a fast paced, enjoyable novella to read. What makes it all the more interesting is that fourteen years afte...more

Tanrı'nın bile batıramayacağı gemi sloganıyla yola çıkan RMS Titanic 15 Nisan 1912'de, Kuzey Atlantik'te, gemi saatiyle 23.29'da buz dağına çarparak batmasına kadar giden facianın ilk adımı atıldı.
Kayıpların hepsi ihmalkârlık -bknz: gemiye yerleştirilmiş filika sayısı- nedeniyle verildiği için ko...more

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