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Historic Boys

Elbridge Streeter Brooks

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Book Excerpt: 
. . .To your ships, vikings, all!" he shouted. "Show your teeth, war-wolves! Up with the serpent banner, and death to Olaf the Swede!"

Straight across the lake to the sea-strait, near where Stockholm now stands, the vikings sailed, young Olaf's dragon-ship taking the lead. But all too late; for, across the narrow strait, the Swedish king had stretched great chains, and had filled up the channel with stocks and stones. Olaf and his Norsemen were fairly trapped; the Swedish spears waved in wild and joyful triumph, and King Olaf, the Swede, said with grim satisfaction to his lords: "See, jarls and lendermen, the Fat Boy is caged at[Pg 48] last!" For he never spoke of his stout young Norwegian namesake and rival save as "Olaf Tjocke,"—Olaf the Thick, or Fat.

The boy viking stood by his dragon-headed prow, and shook his clenched fist at the obstructed sea-strait and the Swedish spears.

"Shall we, then, land, Rane, and fight our way through?" he. . . Read More

Community Reviews

Maybe just because I'm female, but I enjoyed Historic Girls much more. Some of the stories were pretty tedious to get through, perhaps because my history is somewhat rusty. Some, however, were delightful, such as the very last one in the book, about Stephanus Van Rensselaer, boy patroon of New York.