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Clouds

Aristophanes

Book Overview: 

Strepsiades is an Athenian burdened with debt from a bad marriage and a spendthrift son. He resolves to go to the Thinking Shop, where he can purchase lessons from the famous Socrates in ways to manipulate language in order to outwit his creditors in court. Socrates, represented as a cunning, manipulative, irreverent sophist, has little success with the dull-witted Strepsiades, but is able to teach the old man's son Phidippides a few tricks. In the end, the play is a cynical, clever commentary on Old Ways vs. New Ways, to the disparagement of the former.

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Book Excerpt: 
. . .Whether ye are sitting upon the sacred snow-covered summits of Olympus, or in the gardens of Father Ocean form a sacred dance with the Nymphs, or draw in golden pitchers the streams of the waters of the Nile, or inhabit the Maeotic lake, or the snowy rock of Mimas, hearken to our prayer, and receive the sacrifice, and be propitious to the sacred rites. [The following song is heard at a distance, accompanied by loud claps of thunder.] Chorus. Eternal Clouds! Let us arise to view with our dewy, clear-bright nature, from loud-sounding Father Ocean to the wood-crowned summits of the lofty mountains, in order that we may behold clearly the far-seen watch-towers, and the fruits, and the fostering, sacred earth, and the rushing sounds of the divine rivers, and the roaring, loud-sounding sea; for the unwearied eye of Aether sparkles with glittering rays. Come, let us shake off the watery c. . . Read More

Community Reviews

3.5

The Clouds
I read The Clouds more as a historical source than as a drama. I have read in many texts that this play contributed to Socrates' conviction and death close to twenty years after its debut. I was curious to see what Aristophanes could write that could contribute to the demise of such a


(۱) عوام فریبی ، مغلطه و دروغ گفتن در روز روشن ، سوگند خوردن به روز در شب ، ناحق جلوه دادن حقیقی ترینِ حقوق انسانی ، به حاشیه کشاندن متن و به متن کشاندن حواشی نه تنها مهارتِ سوفیست های باستان بود بلکه سیاستمدارانِ امروزی نیز فرزندان خلف آنان هستند. ریشه ی عوام فریبی و پوپولیسم را میتوان در گذشته های

La commedia “Le nuvole” che leggiamo oggi è una rielaborazione che Aristofane fece (presumibilmente tra il 418 e il 421 a.C.) in seguito alla sconfitta subita alle agóni teatrali del 423.
Si tratta di una versione incompleta sopravvissuta nella forma scritta ma, a quanto pare, mai rappresentata.

Lo s

Sigh. I think I'm in the minority here, but for the most part, I just don't find Aristophanes funny. I found myself reading over passages thinking, Okay, I should be laughing, but probably ended up looking like this the entire time:

That is all.

The Clouds may be the best play I've read so far from Aristophanes. It's the cleverest in satire as well as genuinely funny- I mean, if an ancient play can make me laugh as much as an Oscar Wilde play makes me laugh, that's a very, very good sign for what's to come in the future.

In this play, Arist

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