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The Book of Were-Wolves

Sabine Baring-Gould

Book Overview: 

A survey of the myths and legends concerning lycanthropy from ancient times to the Victorian Era.

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Book Excerpt: 
. . .Snorri not only relates that Odin changed himself into another form, but he adds that by his spells he turned his enemies into boars. In precisely the same manner does a hag, Ljot, in the Vatnsd. . . Read More

Community Reviews

Written in the 1860's but still holding up to the test of time this book ranks as a classic of European lore on lycanthropy/shapeshifting in particular pertaining to werewolves. Worth its weight in gold just for the two chapters on Scandinavian wolf lore, and the idea that the viking berserkers were

The main problem with this book is that is horribly misnamed. It should be called "The Book of Cannibals". I was looking for some werewolf mythology maybe some background and origins and instead I get this detailed account of historical cannibals.

In the beginning there are a few instances where the

Fantasy, myth, and religious scholars probably know of Sabine Baring-Gould’s work. He was prolific in his day, specifically in writing hymns. The Book of Were-Wolves is a fascinating read on many levels. First, it shows a lot of the transition of literary styles from the late 1800s to today. Second,

Sabine Baring-Gould’s Book of Werewolves (which was recommended to me by several people here) was originally published in 1865. Baring-Gould treats the phenomenon of the werewolf as a psychological aberration, as essentially a delusional state. He also relates it to cannibalism, and seems to see at

A frustrating read. Not so frustrating as to make me tear off my clothes and howl wildly at the moon, but frustrating nonetheless.

Sabine Baring-Gould relates various werewolf tales from myth and legend, and then fits into a 19th century idea of mental illness. It’s a good idea, disproving supernatur

Europeans who believed they could shape-shift, generally ate children when in proper form, and were often hanged and burned when found out. Really good stuff.

“Job Fincelius relates the sad story of a farmer of Pavia, who, as a wolf, fell upon many men in the open country and tore them to pieces. Aft

Cuando llevas pocas páginas te preguntas ¿Por qué esta en Valdemar Gótica? Pues es un ensayo del hombre lobo, debería haberlo metido en Intempestivas. Error.

Es cierto que el autor hace un recorrido por distintas épocas y zonas. Y nos muestra que el concepto es distinto según siglo o latitudes. Pero

I don't really have much of an interest in the supernatural. I do, however, have an intense interest in others who have an intense interest in the supernatural. A meta-interest, I suppose. I'd love to get to know someone who thinks that the Earth is a hollow shell with spaceships inside. Or someone

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