UNLIMITED Audiobooks and eBooks

Over 30,000 books & works on all major devices

Get ALL YOU CAN for FREE for 30 days!

The Trojan Women

Euripides

Book Overview: 

Euripides' play follows the fates of the women of Troy after their city has been sacked, their husbands killed, and as their remaining families are about to be taken away as slaves. However, it begins first with the gods Athena and Poseidon discussing ways to punish the Greek armies because they condoned Ajax the Lesser for dragging Cassandra away from Athena's temple. What follows shows how much the Trojan women have suffered as their grief is compounded when the Greeks dole out additional deaths and divide their shares of women.

How does All You Can Books work?

All You Can Books gives you UNLIMITED access to over 30,000 Audiobooks, eBooks, and Foreign Language courses. Download as many audiobooks, ebooks, language audio courses, and language e-workbooks as you want during the FREE trial and it's all yours to keep even if you cancel during the FREE trial. The service works on any major device including computers, smartphones, music players, e-readers, and tablets. You can try the service for FREE for 30 days then it's just $19.99 per month after that. So for the price everyone else charges for just 1 book, we offer you UNLIMITED audio books, e-books and language courses to download and enjoy as you please. No restrictions.

Book Excerpt: 
. . .And the dead leave thee wailing!

[One of the huts on the left is now open, and the rest of the Chorus come out severally. Their number eventually amounts to fifteen.

Fourth Woman.

[Antistrophe 1.

Out of the tent of the Greek king I steal, my Queen, with trembling breath: What means thy call? Not death; not death! They would not slay so low a thing! Fifth Woman. O, 'tis the ship-folk crying To deck the galleys: and we part, we part! Hecuba. Nay, daughter: take the morning to thine heart. Fifth Woman. My heart with dread is dying! Sixth Woman. An herald from the Greek hath come! Fifth Woman. How have they cast me, and to whom A bondmaid? Hecuba. Peace, child: wait thy doom. Our lots are near the trying.

[Pg 21]

. . . Read More